We offer to you a very interesting selection of computers, what they were before. Someone, possibly, has seen some of them, another one doesn’t remember nothing of the kind.
But it will be interesting to everybody both to dip in the pas and to open on your own something new. Further you will find the photo gallery with the short description of each model those times.

Puncher card, the pattern 077, 1937
Was developed by IBM for social needs.

Was developed by  IBM for for social needs.

ENIAC Tubes, 1944. Was developed at the end of the Second World War by Americans for technical superiority above an enemy.
Costed 500 000 dollars

Was developed at the and of the Second World War by Americans for technical superiority above an enemy.

ENIAC Wiring, 1944
It could execute to 5000 actions in a second but didn’t have a hard disk, therefore for each new work it had to be switched on a new.

It could execute to 5000 actions in a second but didn’t have  a hard disk, therefore for each new work it had to be switched on a new.

SAGE, 1954
The machine weighed 300 tons and occupied the whole floor. This giant was made for air defense, for watching information from radars in the mode of real time.

The machine weighed 300 tons and occupied the whole floor. This giant was made for air defense, for watching information from radars in the mode of real time.

Johnniac, 1954
Costed 470 000 $
Memory 4 Kb

Johnniac

WISC, 1955
Was developed by Viskonsin University. Could solve 4 equalizations simultaneous. It was the unique phenomenon for that time.
A cost was 50 000 dollars.
Memory, attention, 1 kb!

WISC

NEAC 2203, 1960

NEAC 2203

IBM 7030, 1961
7030 was the first attempt of IBMS to create supercomputer.

IBM 7030

Philco 212, 1962
Costed 1 800 000 $
Memory 64 kb!

Philco 212

Philco 212, 1962

CDC 160A Button Array, 1962

CDC 160A Button Array

PDP-8, 1965
The first minicomputer which successfully was on sale, cost 18 000$.

PDP-8

Supercomputer CDC 6600
Was the most powerful to 1969 year.

Supercomputer CDC 6600

Neiman Marcus Kitchen Computer, 1969
Computer for house-owners.

Neiman Marcus Kitchen Computer

Apple 1, 1976
The predecessor of extraordinarily popular Apple II

The predecessor of extraordinarily popular Apple II

Computer keyboard Commodore 64, 1982
Sold more than 30 million.

Computer keyboard Commodore 64

Bowels of super computer Cray-3, 1993

Bowels of super computer Cray-3

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6 Responses to “Vintage computers”

  1. doda says:

    I think the Commodore keyboard was white or not?

  2. tehun says:

    lmao 584 diggs
    love the design of the Neiman Marcus Kitchen Computer-

  3. Dave Nofmeister says:

    Very awsome! Does anyone know where more of the Eniac computer exists? I’m sure most of it is gone, but it would be interesting to see what was still around.

  4. cptpatriot says:

    The original C-64 had a black keyboard, the C-64C had the white keys when they released it around the time of the C-128.

  5. Trucheli says:

    WRONG Photo for the Apple II had a platic case, Apple I was wood

  6. Staregry@Old games says:

    Do You remember Prince Of Persia wonderfull old game from Commodore and Amiga. Watch Old Games

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